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Genilogic

MAC Assessment Tool

CRAMS is pleased to make available this Manual Handling Assessment Charts (MAC) Tool, which is based on the tool designed and provided by the Health and Safety Executive. The CRAMS MAC tool has been designed to simplify the process of scoring a task for Manual Handling risks and it will automatically create a score sheet for you to print or send to colleagues.You may still need to undertake a full Manual Handling Risk Assessment - to help you decide, the HSE has published a checklist. CRAMS can help you build and maintain all your Risk Assessments, Method Statements and Training Records.

■ Spend some time observing the task (videoing may help - you can add any images or videos in the Task Description box) to ensure that what you are seeing is representative of normal working procedures. You should involve your employees and safety representatives during the assessment process. Where several people do the same task, make sure you have some insight into the demands of the job from all employees’ perspective.

■ Select the appropriate type of assessment (ie lifting, carrying or team handling). If a task involves lifting and carrying, consider both.

■ Determine the level of risk for each risk factor, and click on the appropriate icon for each question. Information on risk reduction can be found on the HSE website at www.hse.gov.uk/msd and in the HSE publication Manual handling at work.

■ The colour bands help determine which elements of the task require attention.

■ Enter the remaining task information and use the scores to help identify which risk factors need to be examined and the total level of exposure to risk.

■ If the individual does a number of tasks, assess each one separately and prioritise action to address the highest scoring task.

Your MAC questions will appear here once you have selected one or more of the MAC Assessment Types above (Lifting, Carrying or Team Handling Operations)

LIFTING OPERATIONS

Note the weight of the load and the frequency (or repetition rate) of the lifting operation. Click on the area of the graph where the task load weight and the number of repetitions intersect. If the colour band is purple you should examine the task very closely as it may represent a serious risk of injury and must be improved. To assess lifting at more than once every five seconds you should carry out a full risk assessment. Repetitive handling of light items will fall within the green zone, but may be associated with upper limb problems. For advice on assessing these tasks see Upper limb disorders in the workplace and Assessment of Repetitive Tasks of the upper limbs (the ART tool) When a job is complex because load weights vary significantly (eg in order picking/ distribution) you can use the Variable manual handling assessment chart (V-MAC) tool to assess the load weight/frequency risk factor instead of this graph, before returning to complete your MAC assessment.

Green Amber Red Purple

Observe the horizontal distance between the worker’s hands and lower back. You should assess the ‘worst-case scenario’, including picking up and putting down. Click on the most appropriate image below to select:

Observe the vertical position of the worker’s hands at both the start and end of the lift. Record the ‘worst-case’ colour band/score. Use the following illustrations as a guide and click on the most appropriate image to select:

Observe the worker’s torso as the load is lifted. If the person twists the torso in relation to the hips OR leans to one side as the load is lifted, the colour band is amber and the score is 1. If the torso both twists AND bends to the side as the load is lifted, the colour band is red and the score is 2.

Look for factors that force workers to modify their postures. If their movements are restricted when lifting because of the space available (eg lifting in a narrow aisle or in a crowded or disorganised storage area) or lifting through narrow gaps, the colour band is amber and the score is 1. If the posture is severely restricted (eg lifting in an area with a low ceiling) the colour band is red and the score is 3.

Look at the quality of the grip that the worker can use to get hold of and control the load. The worker may need to reposition their hands on the object as a lift progresses. If this is so, click on the ‘worst-case scenario’.

Look at the condition of the floor where the handling task takes place. Note that for outdoor work this will depend on the weather. Always assess the ‘worst-case scenario’.

Observe the work environment and score if the lifting operation takes place: in extremes of temperature; with strong air movements; or in extreme lighting conditions (too dark or bright). If one of the risk factors is present score 1, if two or more of the risk factors are present score 2.

CARRYING OPERATIONS

Note the weight of the load and the frequency (or repetition rate) of the carrying operation. Click on the area of the graph below where the weight of the load intersects with the number of carries per hour. If the colour band is purple the task should be examined very closely, as such operations may represent a serious risk of injury and must be improved.

Green Amber Red Purple

Observe the horizontal distance between the worker’s hands and lower back. You should assess the ‘worst-case scenario’, including the start and finish of the task. Click on the most appropriate image below to select:

When carrying, the posture of the worker’s torso and the position of the load are risk factors associated with musculoskeletal injury.Use the following illustrations as a guide and click on the most appropriate image to select.

Look for factors that force workers to modify their postures. If their movements are restricted during the carry (eg a narrow doorway forces the worker to turn or move the load to get through) the colour band is amber and the score is 1. If the posture is severely restricted (eg having to bend forward to carry in an area with a low ceiling), the colour band is red and the score is 3

Look at the quality of the grip that the worker can use to get hold of and control the load. The worker may need to reposition their hands on the object as a lift progresses. If this is so, assess the ‘worst-case scenario’.

Examine the condition of the floor at the locations where the handling task occurs. Note that for outdoor work this will depend on the weather. Always assess the ‘worst-case scenario’.

Observe the task and estimate the total distance that the load is carried (not the distance ‘as the crow flies’).

Count the number of different types of obstacle along the carrying route. If the person has to carry the load up or down a steep slope, up or down steps, through closed doors/narrow doorways or around tripping hazards or round bends and corners, the colour band is amber and the score is 2. If the task involves carrying items up ladders or past two or more obstacles, the colour band is red and the score is 3.

Observe the work environment and score if the carrying operation takes place: in extremes of temperature; with strong air movements; or in extreme lighting conditions (dark, bright or poor contrast). If one of the risk factors is present score 1, if two or more of the risk factors are present score 2.

TEAM HANDLING OPERATIONS

Note the weight of the load and the number of workers performing the task. Click on the appropriate image below to select. For teams of five people or more, a full risk assessment is needed. If the colour band is purple you should examine the task very closely as it may represent a serious risk of injury and must be improved.

Observe the task and examine the horizontal distance between each worker’s hands and their lower back. You should assess the ‘worst-case scenario’, including picking up and putting down. Click on the most appropriate image below to select:

Observe the vertical positions of the workers’ hands at both the start and end of the lift. The effect of stature differences between team members is particularly important when lifting goes above elbow height. Record the ‘worst-case’ colour band/score. Use the following illustrations as a guide and click on the most appropriate image below to select:

Observe the workers’ torsos as they lift the load. If their torsos twist in relation to their hips OR they lean to one side as the load is lifted, the colour band is amber and the score is 1. If their torsos twist AND bend to the side as they lift the load, the colour band is red and the score is 2.

Look for factors that force the team members to modify their postures. If their movements are restricted because of the space available (eg lifting in a narrow aisle or in a crowded or disorganised storage area) or lifting round obstructions, the colour band is amber and the score is 1. If the postures are severely restricted (eg lifting or carrying in an area with a low ceiling) the colour band is red and the score is 3.

Look at the quality of the grip that the workers can use to get hold of and control the load. They may need to reposition their hands on the object as a lift progresses. If this is so, assess the ‘worst-case scenario’

Examine the condition of the floor at the locations where the handling task occurs. Note that for outdoor work this will depend on the weather. Always assess the ‘worst-case scenario’.

Observe the task and estimate the total distance that the load is carried (not the distance ‘as the crow flies’).

Count the number of different types of obstacle along the carrying route. If the team has to carry the load up or down a steep slope, up or down steps, through closed doors/narrow doorways, around tripping hazards or round bends and corners, the colour band is amber and the score is 2. If the task involves carrying items up ladders or past two or more types of obstacle, the colour band is red and the score is 3. Click on the most appropriate icon below:

A good team handling operation will be well planned. Communication between the individuals is essential when lifting as part of a team. An example of good communication would be the workers counting ‘one, two, three’ before they lift. Look to see if the team has control of the load, that it is lifted smoothly, and that all members lift together. An unco-ordinated team lift may leave one member of the team bearing the entire weight.

Observe the work environment and score if the handling operation takes place in extremes of temperature, with strong air movements, or in extreme lighting conditions (dark, bright or poor contrast). If one of the risk factors is present score 1, if two or more of the risk factors are present score 2. Click on the most appropriate icon below: